Author Archives: Joseph Howlett

Constraining the spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon interaction with XENON1T

Since we don’t know how dark matter interacts with more familiar particles, we have to break up our search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) in terms of their possible interactions with xenon nuclei. While many complex interactions are possible, we generally start with two simple cases: WIMP-nucleus interactions that don’t depend on the nuclear spin, and those that do. XENON1T set a world-leading constraint on the former, “spin-independent” interaction in 2018. Today, we released our first results constraining the latter, “spin-dependent” interaction. The results are shown in the following figure:

The spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon interaction contains a range of possible cases, so experiments typically consider two extreme ones: the case where WIMPs only scatter off protons, and the case where they only scatter off neutrons. Most of the spin in xenon is carried by neutrons, so xenon experiments are better at constraining the neutron-only case. These results set the most stringent limit on this case, using the same data and procedure as the spin-independent result. We also tried out a new method of combining our constraints with complementary searches at particle accelerators, following the example of PICO-60. An open-access pre-print version of the paper is available on the arXiv.

XENON1T Calibrations Talk at APS April Meeting

At the 2018 April Meeting of APS last weekend, I presented a brief summary of how and why we calibrate the XENON1T detector. The April Meeting is one of the largest American physics conferences and covers a broad range of research, from nuclear and particle physics to gravitation and cosmology. Below you can see one of the slides that I presented:

This shows how we use data from calibrations to understand every piece of physics in our detector, from a particle entering and hitting a xenon atom to the measurement of the light and charge produced by this interaction. Combining the many different calibrations we do, we develop a complete model of XENON1T which is then used in a statistics framework to determine whether the background data we’ve taken contains WIMPs. Stay tuned as it won’t be too long before we can release those results as well!